Religion in Roman Egypt

Religion in Roman Egypt PDF Author: David Frankfurter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691214735
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 336

Book Description
This exploration of cultural resilience examines the complex fate of classical Egyptian religion during the centuries from the period when Christianity first made its appearance in Egypt to when it became the region's dominant religion (roughly 100 to 600 C.E. Taking into account the full range of witnesses to continuing native piety--from papyri and saints' lives to archaeology and terracotta figurines--and drawing on anthropological studies of folk religion, David Frankfurter argues that the religion of Pharonic Egypt did not die out as early as has been supposed but was instead relegated from political centers to village and home, where it continued a vigorous existence for centuries. In analyzing the fate of the Egyptian oracle and of the priesthoods, the function of magical texts, and the dynamics of domestic cults, Frankfurter describes how an ancient culture maintained itself while also being transformed through influences such as Hellenism, Roman government, and Christian dominance. Recognizing the special characteristics of Egypt, which differentiated it from the other Mediterranean cultures that were undergoing simultaneous social and political changes, he departs from the traditional "decline of paganism/triumph of Christianity" model most often used to describe the Roman period. By revealing late Egyptian religion in its Egyptian historical context, he moves us away from scenarios of Christian triumph and shows us how long and how energetically pagan worship survived.

Later Roman Egypt

Later Roman Egypt PDF Author: Roger S. Bagnall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 318

Book Description
Egypt, with its ever-growing wealth of evidence from the papyri, has in recent decades been one of the liveliest areas of scholarship on the later Roman Empire. This volume collects two dozen articles on the social, economic, and administrative history of Egypt by Roger Bagnall, whose book 'Egypt in Late Antiquity' has helped to bring this region and this evidence into the mainstream of historical debate. In these studies some of the main themes of his work are visible, in particular attempts to explore the possibilities for quantifying not only questions like the burden of taxation or the distribution of land-ownership, but more tantalizing and controversial matters like the rate at which the population of Egypt was Christianized.

Temples as Economic Agents in Early Roman Egypt

Temples as Economic Agents in Early Roman Egypt PDF Author: Andrew J. Connor
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 405

Book Description
Temples are at the heart of most attempts to understand Roman policy in Egypt after Octavian annexed the province in 30 BC. This dissertation examines the evidence for the temples as economic agents in the early Roman period. Through a close reading of a crucial text (P. Tebt. 2.302), I demonstrate that the current scholarly consensus, formed around the assumption that the Roman state aggressively targeted Egyptian religion through the confiscation of temple property, cannot be correct. A new examination, building on our understanding of the economic activities of the temples in the Pharaonic, Persian, and Ptolemaic periods, shows that the temples maintained sometimes substantial estates in the Roman period, and engaged in other economic activities, including agricultural industries and religious services (e.g., mummification). I take the temples of two Fayum villages, Tebtunis and Soknopaiou Nesos, as case studies. Through a careful study of these temples, I illustrate the role that their economic activities played in creating networks of overlapping religious, economic, social, and political interests. These networks allowed the temples to mediate between the Roman state and the people in these villages, especially after the development of a Roman administrative infrastructure to oversee the temples. The evidence for these temples shows in addition that their economic activities were often deliberately arranged. The temple of Soknopaios in Soknopaiou Nesos, for example, oversaw a network of smaller production centers and subsidiary religious structures elsewhere in the Fayum. Roman administration of Egyptian temples was less strict than that by the Ptolemies, and fits into recognizable patterns from elsewhere in the Roman Empire. The temple administrators, whose hierarchy is also described, focused on long-term, risk-averse activities, such as long-term leases and selling certain non-administrative priestly offices (and the associated shares of temple profits). In addition, the temples were directly supported by the Roman state through syntaxis payments. Despite the wide range of economic activities, temples could run into financial difficulties in the Roman period (as they did in earlier periods as well), and some of our clearest evidence for temples in trouble in the early Roman period probably relates to local disputes, such as one from Tebtunis that may stem from unpaid taxes on property. These conclusions have important implications for our understanding of Roman policy towards Egypt and religion in the eastern Mediterranean, and of social, religious, and economic history in the Roman Fayum.

Isis on the Nile. Egyptian Gods in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt

Isis on the Nile. Egyptian Gods in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt PDF Author: Laurent Bricault
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004188827
Category : Religion
Languages : de
Pages : 293

Book Description
Against the background of questions on cultural identity and memory, this book offers an overview of the development of the cults of Isis in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt, often presenting new or unpublished material.

Egyptian Religion

Egyptian Religion PDF Author: Jan Quaegebeur
Publisher: Peeters Publishers
ISBN: 9789042906693
Category : History
Languages : de
Pages : 1525

Book Description
The final stages of Egyptian religion from the Saite period until the rise of christianity are studied here by nearly a hundred scholars from all over the world. The book represents the state of the art on a fascinating period, when paganism in all its forms gradually yielded to monotheism. It combines philology and archaeology, with more than twenty contributions offering a presentation of unknown textual and iconographic material. Egyptian deities and temples are discussed both from the point of view of institutions and of personal religion. In the multicultural society of Graeco-Roman Egypt the relationship between native Egyptians and Greek culture is always at the center of the interest. Thanks to the indexes this will become a standard work of reference in the field of Egyptian religion. The volume is dedicated to Jan Quaegebeur and reflects his wide scope of interests and his impact upon present-day study of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period.

Roman Egypt

Roman Egypt PDF Author: Roger S. Bagnall
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108957129
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :

Book Description
Egypt played a crucial role in the Roman Empire for seven centuries. It was wealthy and occupied a strategic position between the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean worlds, while its uniquely fertile lands helped to feed the imperial capitals at Rome and then Constantinople. The cultural and religious landscape of Egypt today owes much to developments during the Roman period, including in particular the forms taken by Egyptian Christianity. Moreover, we have an abundance of sources for its history during this time, especially because of the recovery of vast numbers of written texts giving an almost uniquely detailed picture of its society, economy, government, and culture. This book, the work of six historians and archaeologists from Egypt, the US, and the UK, provides students and a general audience with a readable new history of the period and includes many illustrations of art, archaeological sites, and documents, and quotations from primary sources.

The Beautiful Burial in Roman Egypt

The Beautiful Burial in Roman Egypt PDF Author: Christina Riggs
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191534874
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 336

Book Description
This important new study looks at the intersection of Greek and Egyptian art forms in the funerary sphere of Roman Egypt. A discussion of artistic change, cultural identity, and religious belief foregrounds the detailed analysis of more than 150 objects and tombs, many of which are presented here for the first time. In addition to the information it provides about individual works of art, supported by catalogue entries, the study explores fundamental questions such as how artists combine the iconographies and representational forms of different visual traditions, and why two distinct visual traditions were employed in Roman Egypt.

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt PDF Author: Christina Riggs
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199571457
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 791

Book Description
This handbook, arranged in seven thematic sections, is unique in drawing together many different strands of research on Roman Egypt, in order to suggest both the state of knowledge in the field and the possibilities for collaborative, synthetic, and interpretive research.

At Home in Roman Egypt

At Home in Roman Egypt PDF Author: Anna Lucille Boozer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108830927
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 350

Book Description
This book draws together a wide range of evidence across disciplines to show how the ordinary people of Roman Egypt experienced and enacted change.

Isis on the Nile. Egyptian Gods in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt

Isis on the Nile. Egyptian Gods in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt PDF Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004210865
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 394

Book Description
Against the background of questions on cultural identity and memory, this book offers an overview of the development of the cults of Isis in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt, often presenting new or unpublished material.